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Tagged ‘Japanese Food‘

NetworkTen: Bruce Millar

Bruce Millar Header Image

1. Hello, who are you?
Bruce Millar, the main writer on The Sunday Times Top 100 Restaurants. I also contribute to and help edit The Sunday Times’s two other restaurant supplements, covering the best 130 places around the country where you can eat for £20 and “around the world in 80 meals” — the best ethnic restaurants in Britain.

2. Tell us a little about your publication and your role within it…
We publish in association with Harden’s Guides, using their tried and tested methodology for collating marks and reviews sent in by thousands of genuine diners who have spent their own money on eating out. So we believe that although enjoyment of a meal is subjective, our ranking is as objective as it is possible to get. My role is to visit restaurants selected from the 100 and interview the chefs. I am not writing a review but describing what is special about each restaurant, and why our voters have chosen it.

3. Recently The Times editor John Witherow shared his expectations for 2016 and predicted “the resurgence of print”. Have you seen evidence of this already?
It certainly appears that the long and steady decline in newspaper print circulations as at last levelling off. Online has all sorts of advantages in terms of speed, convenience and accessibility, but I think people may be realising that it is not considered, edited or mediated in the way that good serious newspapers are (precisely our mantra for producing Social Media content for ourselves and our clients;  consider, edit and mediate and nothing less – Krista Booker, Director, Fourteen Ten). Much of the content of social media is like being shouted at in a bar.

4. Martin Ivens, Editor of The Sunday Times, said: “Our readers already enjoy a great package… The Dish adds extra spice to the mix, satisfying the thousands of them who have a love for all things food.” We have enjoyed the launch of this supplement, is it here to stay and are there any plans to develop it?
Interest in all aspects of food and cooking keeps on growing, and the Sunday Times is sure to go with it. I’m not privy to the commercial decision-making, but I can only see The Dish developing further, in whatever form that may take.

5. What makes a good PR approach?
Interesting, restrained copy with a decent amount of factual detail that shows some insight into the product it is promoting, as well as some insight into my requirements as a journalist, is always appealing. Soft-sell is always preferable to hard-sell.

6. What makes a bad PR approach?
Breathless and cliche-filled copy full of hyperbole is always underwhelming. If it’s sprinkled with spelling mistakes, I assume it was written by a know-nothing school-leaver on work experience — and that the executive responsible was too busy lunching a client to do the work. (thank you for raising this Bruce, these are practices Fourteen Ten work very hard to avoid, in fact we tend to take our Interns with us on said lunches – David Farrer, Director, Fourteen Ten)

7. What was your restaurant moment of 2015?
Too many to count. But if you insist… well, finally eating at L’Enclume after reading about it for so many years was wonderful — 18 courses at lunchtime, and I didn’t feel stuffed. I had eaten at Sat Bains in Nottingham before, but he came top on our list this year, and it was great to catch up with him and eat his brilliant cooking again. And I had never tasted with such intensity as I did at Araki — it was a revelation to eat sushi prepared in front of my eyes by one of Japan’s greatest masters, now working in London. And it is amazing how expense powers your concentration… A fortnight in the summer in Tokyo and on the Izu peninsular a bit further south included at least half a dozen great restaurant experiences — including a place where you catch your own fish in a big tank before the chef slices it up for you. The standard is extraordinarily high because all Japanese are serious foodies, so a bad restaurant will soon go out of business.

8. We understand you have a keen interest in Japanese food, which is your favourite Japanese restaurant in London and why?
I really enjoyed Koya in Frith Street, now closed but replaced by Koya Bar. And Namban in Brixton is a great addition — opened by an American fan of Japanese food.

9. We’ve seen trends for dishes such as Yakitori, Okonomiyaki and more recently Ramen in London. Are there any new Japanese foods you expect, or would like, to take their turn in the limelight?
What I really like in Japan are the highly specialised restaurants. There are legendary places that only serve one dish, but it is perfect. I went to one tiny yakitoria that sold nothing but bits of chicken barbecued on sticks, but there were half a dozen chefs working flat out and probably 50 different items on the menu. That would be great in London…

10. What were you doing at 14.10 today (or yesterday)?
Eating lunch in the canteen: rice and beans that I cooked at home, for reasons of both taste and economy.

Thank you, Bruce!

Introducing Regional Food from Japan’s Oita Prefecture

Oita Prefecture

Japan’s Oita Prefecture are coming to London this month bringing Bungo, Donko and Kabosu-buri from Oita to the Capital for the first time.

The incredibly lush Oita region is found on Kyushu Island in South Japan. 70% of Oita is covered by forests and rivers encircled by 759 kilometers of coastline that has shoals in the north and a jagged coastline in the south. The coastal waters contribute to a prosperous fishing industry and the streams that flow from the mountain ranges give rich water sources to arable farm land.

Bungo beef comes from cattle raised in Oita’s beautiful region of rolling mountains. It is regarded as some of the very best beef in Japan and has a rich yet mild melt in the mouth flavour. Donko is the highest grade shiitake found growing from forest oak logs. These mushrooms are hand-harvested and sun-dried at their peak to capture the best flavour and most nutrients. Kabosu-buri is Japanese yellowtail that have been fed on a famous delicacy of Oita Prefecture, the kabosu lime, a citrus fruit that imparts a delicate note to the fish.

Dishes Available
Oita Sushi Rolls – Kabuso-buri, Donko Shiitake Mushrooms and Bungo Beef (£9.50)
Donko Steak – Donko Shiitake prepared on the Tepan (£6.80)
Bungo Beef Tataki – Roasted Bungo dressed with Sweet Soy and Wasabi Mayonnaise (£15)
Bungo Beef in Gunkan and Nigiri Style (£9.50)
Oita Set-Meals are available for lunch (£18.90 and dinner (£49.80/£59)

Availability
Available until October 15th-25th
Hosted by:
Benihana Chelsea, 77 Kings Road, SW3 4N. Tel: 020 7376 7799
Benihana Piccadilly, 37 Sackville Street, W1S 3EH. Tel: 020 7494 2525

If you would like further information on Bungo, Donko or Kabuso
please do not hesitate to contact Krista Booker

Benihana 50th Anniversary Wagyu Beef Menu

Wagyu Beef

Benihana opened their first restaurant 50 years ago and to commemorate the occasion by offering a promotional menu that celebrates both the lifting of the import ban on Japanese Wagyu and Benihana’s unique heritage.

The 50th Anniversary Wagyu menu begins with the traditional starters of Onion Soup and Salad followed by Sushi, Tempura and the classic Prawn Appetiser, Courgettes, Onion Volcano and Hibachi Rice.

Diners are then served Wagyu known around the word for its sweet aroma and rich flavour. The Benihana style of cooking suits Wagyu beef very well as the marbling benefits from swift cooking at a high heat and the sweet fragrance given off when cooking (due to increased amino acids) can be appreciated by the diners seated around a Teppan.

The Wagyu can be compared with a dish of the Scottish Fillet or, at the diners preference, the Black Cod with Miso.

This ten-course meal is finished with an ice-cream dessert.

The price of the Benihana 50th Anniversary Wagyu menu is only £50 per person for a limited time to allow diners to experience Wagyu at an affordable price – before returning to the rrp of around £100 for the Wagyu alone.

For press enquiries please contact us

Wagyu Beef Menu